Staff and faculty are working remotely and all remain on email and able to set up phone and virtual meetings upon request. We are doing our best to respond to calls and emails when they come in and will respond to requests as soon as possible.

Phone: 520-621-2585 and 520-621-6298
Email: Anthro@email.arizona.edu
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Undergrad FAQs

Questions

How Can I Get into the University of Arizona?

Which Tier One Courses Will Introduce Me to Anthropology?

How Do I Declare an Anthropology Major or Minor?

What is a Senior Degree Check?

What Can I Do with a Bachelor's Degree in Anthropology?

What Careers Are Possible With an Anthropology Major?

What Knowledge and Skills Define Anthropologists?

What Skills and Experiences Characterize Anthropology?

Where Can I find Information on Anthropology Careers?

What Are the Steps Involved in Applying to Graduate School?

 

Answers

How Can I Get into the University of Arizona?

All decisions concerning admission to the University are made by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Old Main Building (520-621-3237).

The Office of Admissions also determines what transfer courses will be accepted by the University for incoming students. Currently enrolled students who enroll in other institutions and want to transfer courses must submit transcripts to the Office of the Registrar (P.O. Box 210066, Tucson, AZ 85721-0066). Once the transfer work has been accepted by the University, the Senior Academic Advisor in the Anthropology Department, Ann Samuelson, determines how courses may be used toward the student's degree program. Back to top.

Which Tier One Courses Will Introduce Me to Anthropology?

  • ANTH 150B1: Many Ways of Being Human: Anthropological Perspective This course introduces the student to anthropological perspectives on cultural diversity. The course focuses on gender, race, ethnicity and class through readings by and about peoples of the non-western world.

  • ANTH 150C1:  Humanity: A How to Guide. The ways we investigate the human experience are as diverse as those experiences themselves. This course examines human origins, diversity, and culture through foundational readings and case studies that emphasize current global approaches to studying humanity with the goal of better understanding our place in the world.

  • ANTH 160A1: World Archaeology.  This course takes an explicitly global perspective exploring some important events in the history of humankind. World Archaeology examines global migration, sedentism, origins of agriculture, and the development of complex social systems through different times, places and cultures.

  • ANTH 160D1: Origins of Human Diversity This course explores the biological and cultural evolution of the human species over the last several million years and examines human similarities and diversity globally. Approaches utilized include archaeology, biological anthropology, ecology, genetics, and geology.

  • ANTH 170C1: Human Variation in the Modern World Fundamental concepts and principles of human biology emphasizing the evolutionary processes that create organic diversity. An in-depth study of biological differences existing within and between populations of our species focusing on genetic mechanisms and adaptive strategies.

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How Do I Declare an Anthropology Major or Minor?
To declare the Anthropology major please click the link "Make an Advising Appt".  Back to top.

What is a Senior Degree Check?
Students in the senior year must declare their intention to graduate by filing an Graduation Application in their UAccess Account.  The advisor will then contact the student when a degree audit it prepared and ready to go over.

What Can I Do With a Degree in Anthropology?

The kinds of skills learned in Anthropology can translate to a variety of occupations and professional tracks. These include careers in communications, government, public service, business, tourism, museums, law, education, research, human resources, planning and development, nonprofits, health-related professions, international relations, and sustainability and conservation. A major in Anthropology also provides an academic foundation for graduate studies in law, medicine, anthropology, sociology, and public health. Back to top.

PowerPoint Presentation: Choosing a Career in Anthropology: A World of Opportunities

What Careers Are Possible With an Anthropology Major?

Sample Job Titles:

Anthropologist
Museum Conservator/Curator
Human Rights Advocate
Ethnoscientist
International Aid Worker
Anthropology Instructor, Postsecondary
Grant Coordinator
Museum Education Director
Human Resources Specialist
Volunteer Director (Non-Profits, NGOS)
Museum Director
Corporate Anthropologist
Anthropology Professor
State Department Analyst
Development Anthropologist
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What Knowledge and Skills Define Anthropologists?

Anthropologists possess certain skills and knowledge that distinguish them from many other social science disciplines and professional fields. While Anthropologists specialize in different subdisciplines such as cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, and medical anthropology, and even further specialize around geographic regions and topics within subdisciplines, they also share something in common: knowledge of human variation across time and space and appreciation of cultural, biological, and linguistic diversity. The cross-cultural and holistic perspective cultivated within the discipline of Anthropology encourages sensitivity toward and respect for other viewpoints and attitudes. When applied in the real world, the anthropological perspective results in better products and programs as well as more productive working relationships. Back to top.

What Skills and Experiences Characterize Anthropology?

At its most basic form, Anthropology centers on the question of what it means to be human. Students pursuing a B.A. or B.S. in Anthropology acquire skills and experiences required for conducting research, sharing ideas and engaging in critical thinking, communicating cross-culturally, and solving contemporary social problems.

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Where Can I find Information on Anthropology Careers?

The Advising Office in the School of Anthropology emails information about jobs and special events related to postgraduate employment. Faculty members provide guidance and write letters of recommendation.

The University of Arizona Office of Student Engagement and Career Development helps you explore your options. Advisors offer career counseling, provide information about jobs, and help with writing resumes and preparing for interviews.

The Office of Student Engagement and Career Development web site has information about career opportunities, internships, and jobs in organizations that hire anthropology majors. The Office of Student Engagement and Career Development site also provides links to other sites. Back to top.

What Are the Steps Involved in Applying to Graduate School?

Think carefully about your area of interest. What do you want to be able to do with a graduate degree in anthropology?

Start early! The best way to learn about the graduate school experience is to talk to faculty and current graduate students. For information about the School of Anthropology graduate program at the University of Arizona and for application materials, see the Advising Center. To find out about other programs, read program information received from other departments posted on the bulletin board across the hall from the Advising Center.

Use the American Anthropological Association Guide to locate people and programs. Search web sites of particular departments to obtain more information. Pay attention to submission deadlines, admission requirements, graduate program requirements, scholarships and financial aid, academic resources, and teaching and research opportunities. Web sites also may include application materials. If not, write to appropriate Directors of Graduate Studies for application packets

Most graduate programs in anthropology require a personal statement and Curriculum Vitae (CV-similar to a resume), an official undergraduate transcript(s) with a list of completed courses and grade point average (GPA), Graduate Record Examination (GRE General Test; fee required) scores, and two or more letters of recommendation. The Director of Undergraduate Studies and other faculty can provide guidance. Faculty members also write letters of recommendation.

Obtain official undergraduate transcripts from each college or university that you attended. University of Arizona transcripts are available from the Office of Curriculum and Registration.

Contacts:
Office of the Registrar
2nd and 3rd Floors
Transcript: (520) 621-3113

The University of Arizona Testing Office offers the GRE General Test on the computer. To learn about required fees, contact the office or visit the web site.

The University of Arizona Testing Office
220 W. 6th Street, Room 116
Phone: (520) 621-7589

Email:  Test@email.ariona.edu

You can take the CatTran to this non-campus location from Old Main. 

The Testing Office also offers preparation courses sometimes. 

GRE, Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 6000
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000
Phone: 1-800-GRE-CALL
Email: https://www.ets.org/gre/contact/contact_form
https://www.ets.org/gre/

 

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