Elizabeth Eklund

About Elizabeth Eklund

Elizabeth Eklund is from California.  Born in San Diego, she received her B.S. in environmental sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, minoring in anthropology and environmental economics and policy. She went on to receive a master of science in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville where she studied how natural and cultural resources are preserved in the United States National Park and National Forest Systems, focusing on how protected areas are established and what this means for local people. She then earned a master of arts in Anthropology from San Diego State University studying an international framework for establishing protected areas (UNESCO's Man in the Biosphere, Biosphere Reserve program), focusing on the process of proposing a new Biosphere Reserve in the Sierras Guadalupe and Giganta in Baja California Sur.  At SDSU Elizabeth served as SDSU Southwestern Consortium for Environmental Research and Policy (SCERP) coordinator, assisting with a variety of tasks including helping organize a binational workshop on the management of the Tijuana River Watershed, held in May 2013 in Tijuana, Baja California, and Imperial Beach, California.

Selected Publications

Ganster, Paul, and Elizabeth Eklund. 2013. Managing the Binational Tijuana River Watershed: A Workshop. Southwest Consortium for Environmental Research and Policy (SCERP) FY2010-2013 Final Report. Prepared by W.L. Hargrove, Director, CERM.The University of Texas at El Paso: El Paso. Pages 230-244.

Courses Taught

University of Arizona, Tucson
Instructor, Anthropology (ANTV) 307: Ecological Anthropology, UA South, Fall 2016
Instructor, Anthropology 150B1: Many Ways of Being Human, New Start, Summer 2016
Teaching Assistant for Professor Alvarez, Anthropology 200: Cultural Anthropology, Spring 2016
Teaching Assistant for Professor Nichter, Anthropology/Sociology 310: Culture and the Individual, Fall 2015
Instructor, Anthropology 307: Ecological Anthropology, Summer Pre-Session, 2015
Teaching Assistant for Professor De Vet, Anthropology 150B1: Many Ways of Being Human, Spring 2015
Teaching Assistant for Professor Blake, Anthropology 160A1: Traditions and Cultures Patterns in Prehistory, Fall 2014
Instructor, Anthropology 307: Ecological Anthropology, Summer Session II, 2014
Teaching Assistant for Dr. Eadie,  Anthropology 170C1: Human Variation in the Modern World, Spring 2014
Teaching Assistant for Professor Park, Anthropology 150B1: Many Ways of Being Human, Fall 2013
 
University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Accelerated Academic Writing, Spring 2007, Fall 2006
Lab Section, Practical Concepts in Environmental Sciences Spring 2006, Fall 2005, Fall 2004 (main course taught by Linda Bloom)
Teaching assistant for Cassandra Frasier's CCSC 200: Designing Matter, Spring 2005
Grader for Vivian Thomson's Introduction to Environmental Policy, Spring 2006, Fall 2004
 

Research Interests

Water, water policy, environmental anthropology, transboundry ecosystems and watersheds, conservation, parks and protected areas, science and technology studies, ethnohistory, community-based collaboration.

Regions: North America / Latin America (esp. US Southwest / Northwestern Mexico)

Elizabeth Eklund's picture

Contact Information

Degree(s)

Masters of Arts, Anthropology.  San Diego State University, San Diego, California. August, 2013.

Thesis:  “Processes of Protection:  A Review of the Pathway to Establish New Protected Area In Baja California Sur.”

Masters of Science, Environmental Sciences. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. May, 2007.

Thesis: “Evaluating the Yellowstone Management Model:  A Comparison of Environmental Parameters on US Federally Managed Lands With and Without Residents.”

Bachlors of Science,  Major:  Environmental Science  Minors:  Anthropology, Environmental Economics and Policy.  University of California, Berkeley,  Berkeley, California.  May, 2004.

Senior Thesis:  “Changing Perspectives:  The Attitude of the Scientific Community Toward Wildlife As Shown in the Recorded Population Patterns of Ravens and Crows in the San Francisco Bay Area.”