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Michelle Bezanson Interviewed on NPR Radio

Michelle Bezanson (PhD, Arizona 2006), Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Santa Clara University, where she teaches Jean Auel’s “The Clan of the Cave Bear” in her course on popular culture and biological anthropology was interviewed by award-winning journalist Tom Ashbrook on his broadcast "On Point" which is broadcast for two hours daily across the country on NPR. The show's lively conversation covers everything from breaking news to ancient poetry, and features writers, politicians, journalists, artists, scientists and ordinary citizens from around the world. Broadcast live from 10 a.m. to noon ET, with listener call-in, from WBUR in Boston, the show airs again throughout the day and evening on more than 190 NPR stations coast to coast. This is Dr. Bezanson's debut on national radio with a discussion about teaching and prehistoric fiction. She thinks she was was contacted by NPR for the interview because of her "strange class on popular culture and biological anthropology." She appears at the 20 minute mark and you can listen at this link.

Bezanson is a biological anthropologist at Santa Clara University with research interests in evolutionary anthropology, primate behavioral ecology, and human ecology. Her research has focused on ontogenetic (the life history of an individual) effects on posture, locomotion, prehensile-tail use, and the behavioral, arboreal, and resource-based contexts of these patterns in wild mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) and white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) inhabiting tropical forests in Costa Rica and Nicaragua.  Currently, she is examining how omnivory, large brains, and fine manipulative abilities influence the evolution of life history features in nonhuman primates.

Published Date: 

8 years 10 months ago

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